Recipe of the Month - October 2009


Apple Breakfast Muffins


Ingredients:

  • cup all-purpose flour
  • cup whole wheat flour
  • 1 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • teaspoon baking soda
  • teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • cup oat bran
  • cup firmly packed brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 cups peeled, cored, and finely chopped apples (Cortland work nicely)


Directions:

  1. Heat oven to 400 degrees. 

  2. Grease twelve 3-inch muffin cups or line with paper liners. 

  3. In large bowl, combine both flours, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. 

  4. In medium bowl, beat buttermilk, oat bran, brown sugar, oil, and egg until blended. 

  5. Stir buttermilk mixture into flour mixture just until combined.  Fold in the apples.

  6. Divide batter among muffin cups.  Bake for 18 to 20 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in centers comes out clean.  Cool muffins in pan 5 minutes; remove from pan and cool on wire rack.   

     

Yield: Makes 12 muffins.


Nutritional Information:


121 calories, 4g protein, 3g fat, 21g carbohydrate, 3g fiber, 134mg sodium, 18mg cholesterol



Fun Food Fact!


WAC Fun Food Facts of the Month

Apples have many health benefits.  The following health claims are Federally approved.   


Fiber-containing fruits and cancer:
Low fat diets rich in fiber-containing fruits, vegetables and grain products may reduce the risk of some types of cancer, a disease associated with many factors. Apples are an excellent source of fiber.

Fiber-containing fruits and the risk of coronary heart disease: Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol and rich in fruits, vegetables and grain products that contain certain types of dietary fiber, particularly soluble fiber, may reduce the risk of heart disease, a disease associated with many factors. Apples are naturally fat-free, saturated fat-free, and cholesterol-free, and are an excellent source of fiber.

Fat and cancer: Eating a healthful diet low in fat may help reduce the risk of some types of cancers. Development of cancer is associated with many factors, including what you eat. Apples are naturally fat-free.

Saturated fat and cholesterol and heart disease: While many factors affect heart disease, diets low in saturated fat, cholesterol and total fat may reduce the risk of this disease. Apples are naturally fat-free and cholesterol-free.

Sodium and hypertension: Diets low in sodium may reduce the risk of high blood pressure, a disease associated with many factors. Apples are naturally sodium-free.