Tech Neck & Shoulder Pain ▶

Sitting at a desk all day sucks…or worse, sitting a couch, kitchen table or bed while you're working from home. While some of us are lucky enough to have home offices with standing desks and double monitors, many of us are limited to laptops, phones and working from whatever quiet space we can find. 

While working from your bed sounds like it might be cozy, we're making ergonomic compromises that can cause neck and shoulder pain.

Being hunched over at a 60-degree angle while looking down at your computer is the equivalent of having a 60-pound weight strapped to the back of your neck. 

Here are 2 easy solutions for ensuring your tech doesn't become a (literal) pain in the neck! 

Raise your computer to eye level. 
This alleviates both neck and eye strain. 

There's an app for that!
Download an app for your Android phone called "Text Neck – Indicator," or for Apple users, try "Neck Check." This will alert you when your phone is not in the ideal positioning. 

Take a minute to think about it…how has the use of technology impacted your physical health? 

Hunching over your laptop can also give you shoulder pain. 

Here are 3 easy exercises to help alleviate some of your shoulder pain or tightness. And it only takes 9 minutes or less per day.

 

Incline scapular squeeze
Get on your knees and place your hands on an elevated surface (a couch works great for this). Make sure your head is even with your spine. Then, squeeze your shoulder blades together and push them apart. 

Alternating goal posts
Stand against a wall. Make sure your neck, elbows, and everything else is flat against the wall. Keep your arms and elbows bent at a 90-degree angle and alternate. 

W-I's
If the alternating goal posts are difficult for you, then I recommend trying this instead. Ensure you are flat against the wall again for this one. Then, make the letters W and I with your arms. These will help boost your blood flow and productivity for the remainder of the day! 

How do you stay loose during the day?

By Derek Deprey, WAC Director of People & Service